LNG 101 week four: Shipping LNG around the globe
Nov04

LNG 101 week four: Shipping LNG around the globe

Natural gas is normally shipped by pipeline, but it is impractical to build a pipeline from the Middle East or Africa to the United States and other locations. This logistical challenge has led to the creation of special ships capable of carrying the liquid form of natural gas — LNG. LNG carriers are “tank ships” — merchant vessels designed to transport liquids in bulk. The first LNG carrier was launched from the Calcasieu River on the Louisiana Gulf coast in January 1959 with the world’s first ocean cargo of LNG and it sailed to the UK where the cargo was delivered. The expansion of the LNG trade has led to a large expansion of the fleet. Hundreds of vessels have been built and today, giant LNG ships are sailing worldwide. Every single LNG ship that is seaworthy is active. There is not much spare capacity anywhere in the world. Early LNG ships were made with independent aluminum cargo tanks, with a capacity of 27,000 cubic meters and were used in the Algerian LNG trade in the late 1960s. Today, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) rules specify that all LNG ships must be one of three types. Type A are those built according to standard oil tank design. Type C refers to those that have a pressure vessel design. Type B refers to tanks that are neither of the first two types. In the eyes of the Coast Guard, all LNG tanks are Type B because Type B tanks must be designed without any of the general assumptions that go into designing the other tank types. There are three general Type B tank designs for LNG. The first type of design, the membrane tank, is supported by the hold it occupies. The other two designs, spherical and prismatic, are self-supporting. Membrane tanks are composed of a layer of metal, a layer of insulation, another liquid-proof layer, and another layer of insulation. These layers are then attached to the walls of the hold. In the case of the first design, the primary and secondary barriers are sheets of nickel steel. Unlike regular steel, this nickel steel barely contracts upon cooling. All membranes are built up from the surface of a hold using units of insulation, called panels, that are anchored to it. Special insulation is inserted around the anchors. A membrane design is very complex with many design elements. The year was 1969 when Phillips Petroleum and Marathon Oil began shipping natural gas from Cook Inlet to Japan. The Polar Alaska and the Arctic Tokyo, identical LNG carriers, were specially designed pressure vessels just for this purpose. The tanks on these...

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Alliance in the news: Frontiersman spotlights trade associations
Nov04

Alliance in the news: Frontiersman spotlights trade associations

The Frontiersman spotlights trade associations in Alaska and singles out the Alliance as being one of the bright spots in Alaska. “One of the most successful Alaska trade associations is the Alaska Support Industry Alliance. Led by Rebecca Logan, a tenacious and well-informed champion of a sustainable economy, the Alliance is the signature advocacy and information source in the state for promoting responsible exploration, development and production of oil, gas and mineral resources. When I asked Logan about expansion (or not) of the association’s membership over her three years as the executive director, she explained that the Alliance has added 150 members, with a current membership of 500 businesses who employ 30,000 people in the state. Her vision is to continue to grow and remain cohesive, noting “the potential is endless. Every business in the state could be a member because every business in some capacity supports oil, gas and mining.” Logan has the right attitude, but we need more executive directors like her and trade associations like Alliance.” Read the whole...

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ASRC Energy Services, a partner in Alaska’s oil and gas industry
Nov04

ASRC Energy Services, a partner in Alaska’s oil and gas industry

ASRC Energy Services (AES) is a minority owned Alaskan oil and gas service company employing over 5,000 people in 31 states. A wholly owned subsidiary of Arctic Slope Regional Corporation and headquartered in Anchorage, AES is one of the largest private sector employers in Alaska. AES’s family of companies includes: ASRC Energy Services Alaska, Inc. ASRC Energy Services E&P Technology, Inc. ASRC Energy Services-Houston Contracting Company, Inc. ASRC Energy Services Response Operations, LLC Omega Natchiq, Inc. Petrochem Insulation, Inc. From engineering to pipeline construction, response operations to drilling support, AES is a vital part of Alaska’s oil and gas industry.  In their words: “We offer a full range of services for all phases of an oil field’s lifecycle, from exploration and field development to production optimization and decommissioning, as well as offshore oil response equipment.” The Alliance is proud to have ASRC Energy Services involved in our efforts to responsibly develop Alaska’s resources. We invite you to learn more about the work they do at www.asrcenergy.com.  ...

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CH2M Hill, Alaska’s pioneer spirit in action
Nov04

CH2M Hill, Alaska’s pioneer spirit in action

CH2M Hill ‘s history with Alaska goes back to serving government clients during the 1964 earthquake. Today, they are one of the largest private employers in the state with over 2900 Alaska employees with over $300 million invested in facilities, equipment and infrastructure in our state. CH2M Hill has served Alaskan clients continuously for over 45 years, with involvement in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, infrastructure development, and oil, gas and mining projects throughout the state. “We are a project delivery company, with the full-service capability and capacity, to help you advance any energy, mining, transportation, water, environmental, or facilities project from concept through operations.“ With a long history and an active presence in the communities and state, CH2M Hill and its employees continue to better Alaska through their work as a full-service project delivery company. Visit CH2M Hill to learn more about the services they...

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Samson Seattle Warehouse and Breakbulk Facility to Open November 1st
Nov02

Samson Seattle Warehouse and Breakbulk Facility to Open November 1st

Samson’s new warehouse and breakbulk facility will open November 1st.   The facility is located just off Highway 99, south of downtown Seattle and just north of the SeaTac Airport, at 9228 10th Ave South, Seattle, WA 98108. This 20,000 sq ft cross dock facility offers 40 doors and 6 acres of room to receive breakbulk cargo. Warehouse and receiving hours will be Monday through Friday 7am to 5pm and Saturday 9am to 1pm. We will receive cargo for our entire service at this facility, with the exception of oversize and full loads. We look forward to serving our customers from our new facility!  ...

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