LNG 101: What it is, who uses it, and why
Oct15

LNG 101: What it is, who uses it, and why

Liquefied natural gas, or LNG, is natural gas converted to its liquid form. When natural gas is cooled to minus-259 degrees Fahrenheit, it becomes a clear, colorless, odorless liquid. LNG is produced by taking natural gas from a production field, processing it to remove impurities, and then liquefying the processed gas. LNG isn’t corrosive or toxic. It doesn’t explode or burn as a liquid. Natural gas is primarily methane, with low levels of other hydrocarbons, water, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, oxygen and some sulfur compounds. During the process known as liquefaction, natural gas is cooled below its boiling point, removing most of these compounds. The remaining natural gas is primarily methane with only small amounts of other hydrocarbons. LNG weighs less than half the weight of water so it will float if spilled on water. Converting natural gas to LNG, a process that greatly reduces its volume — similar to reducing the volume of a beach ball to the volume of a Ping-Pong ball — allows it to be transported on cargo ships. Once delivered to its destination, LNG is warmed back into its original gas state so that it can be used just like existing natural gas supplies, sending it through pipelines to be distributed to homes and businesses. Natural gas transported as LNG is used for residential, commercial and industrial purposes like heating and cooling homes, cooking, generating electricity and manufacturing paper, metal, glass and other materials. LNG is also being used on a small scale to fuel heavy-duty vehicles. Because it is easy to transport, LNG makes previously stranded natural gas economical. These are typically natural gas deposits where the construction of a pipeline is uneconomical. LNG is usually transported by specialized tanker with insulated walls, and is kept in liquid form by auto refrigeration, a process in which the LNG is kept at its boiling point. Any heat additions are offset by the energy lost from LNG vapor that is vented out of storage and used to power the vessel. Imported LNG makes up a little bit more than 1 percent of natural gas used in the United States. LNG imports represent an important part of the natural gas supply picture in the United States, especially to areas where there are limited pipelines delivering from US natural gas basins. LNG takes up much less space than natural gas, which again, allows it to be shipped much more efficiently. Interest in LNG imports for the US had increased with higher natural gas prices during the 2000 to 2009 period. Technology advances have lowered costs for liquefaction and regasifying, shipping and storing LNG. Companies have announced plans to construct...

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Price Gregory working in Alaska
Oct15

Price Gregory working in Alaska

For nearly 40 years this Alliance member has been an integral part of the Prudhoe Bay landscape. Price Gregory is responsible for completing more than half of all the pipeline construction work and approximately 25% of all the facility construction work at Prudhoe Bay between 1978 and 2010. Price Gregory shared with us more about their history: In 1974, H. C. Price established an Alaskan division to construct Section 3 of the 800 mile long Trans Alaska Pipeline System. After successfully completing this section by 1977, Price was recognized as having provided the lowest instal- lation cost per unit length on the entire project. CORE BUSINESS Price Gregory’s non-pipeline projects typically include a wide variety of work disciplines including: civil, structural, mechanical, electrical, and instrumentation. Throughout the years, Price has broadened the scope of its activities to include: Construction of Power Generation Plants Construction of Oil and Gas Processing Facilities Construction of Gas Compressor Stations Construction of Public Utilities & Infrastructure Works Maintenance Services for Oil & Gas Pipelines and Related Plants and Terminals *Image courtesy of Price Gregory...

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Udelhoven, supporting Alaska’s oil industry for 40 years
Oct15

Udelhoven, supporting Alaska’s oil industry for 40 years

The Alaska based company has built its reputation on the premise of safety first. Following one of the most stringent health and safety standards, company leaders say they have a zero incidence goal. This Alliance member provides construction services to industry and commerce. Here is how Udelhoven describes their company. Established on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula in 1970, Udelhoven Oilfield System Services, Inc. has served the special needs of general contracting and oil production from Cook Inlet to Prudhoe Bay for over forty years. As a licensed contractor we have a proven record of support in the industry. Over the years we have maintained a steady and consistent growth; serving clients in Alaska, Washington, Texas, Georgia, Montana, Tennessee, China, Turkey, Canada, Korea, Republic of Georgia, Bermuda, Singapore, Baku, Trinidad, Russia and Venezuela. From the beginning Udelhoven has been guided by the operating premise of founder Jim Udelhoven: Provide quality service by utilizing conscientious, professional managers and crafts people. This commitment has made us a dynamic growth oriented company that continues to meet our clients’ needs and requirements. *Image courtesy of...

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Carlile makes Alaska a priority
Oct15

Carlile makes Alaska a priority

Carlile sets the standards in going green and supporting Alaska’s communities. The transportation company has been awarded and recognized for its ongoing efforts to reduce it’s environmental impact. The company is also a proud sponsor of Olympic hopefuls from Alaska Pacific University and many of their drivers have even been featured on the hit show Ice Road Truckers. Here’s what our Alliance member has to say about their mission and history: At Carlile, our mission is to provide dependable transportation services to the people and businesses of North America, ensuring stable, profitable growth, employee pride and a positive public image. Our History Founded in 1980 by brothers John and Harry McDonald, Carlile has grown from two tractors to one of Alaska’s largest trucking companies. Today, Carlile’s wholly owned terminals serve Alaska from Anchorage, Fairbanks, Kenai, Kodiak, Prudhoe Bay and Seward, as well as Seattle, WA, Houston, TX, Blaine, MN, and Edmonton, AB. *Image courtesy of Carlile Transportation...

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A Message from the General Manager
Oct14

A Message from the General Manager

General Managers Message – 10/16/13 Welcome to our new website!  This website has been designed to make information more accessible, registration for events easier and to fit in the frame of an iPhone. The most significant part of this new website, however, is the banner.  Throughout the coming year, this space will be used to highlight and promote our members.   It is our plan to publish a “member profile” for every single Alliance member in the coming year.   Earlier this month, we asked you to provide pictures of your company activities, and as you can see, the pictures tell a great story!  If you haven’t already submitted your pictures – you may still do so by emailing them to Renee Reeve at rlimoge@alaskaalliance.com.  Renee will be contacting every member to get information to be used in their company profile. We also plan to use the banner to promote our members anytime that they are in the news.   The  member  profiles and news clips shared in this banner will be forwarded to our Alliance Facebook page and used in our Twitter account.  This use of social media will result in thousands of Alaskans viewing information about your company. We hope you enjoy the new layout and the opportunity to have  your company promoted through social media venues. Respectfully, Rebecca Logan General...

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