Three elected as directors of the Alaska Support Industry Alliance
Oct30

Three elected as directors of the Alaska Support Industry Alliance

Three Alaskan business leaders have been elected to three-year terms as  directors of the Alaska Support Industry Alliance and four others were elected to second terms at the Alaska Support Industry Alliance’s Annual Meeting and Board Elections recently in Anchorage. New directors are: Pattey Parker of Baker Hughes Inc.; Patrick Walsh, past director of the Alliance and senior vice president at Peak Oilfield Service Co.; Frank Weiss, also a past director of the Alliance,  with Arctic Slope Regional Corp. Energy Services. Re-elected to the Alliance’s 41-member board were:  Reed Christensen, Dowland-Bach Corp; Bob Dickson, Atkinson, Conway & Gagnon; Matt Melton, Alaska Chadux and Scott Stewart, Arctic Controls. The Alaska Support Industry Alliance, founded in 1979, is a trade organization representing nearly 500 member companies and 30,000 Alaskan workers. They advocate for the responsible exploration, development and production of Alaska’s oil, gas and mineral resources. Read more here:...

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LNG 101 week three: The Upstream Chain
Oct29

LNG 101 week three: The Upstream Chain

The LNG process, one that is much more complex than pipeline transportation, is often referred to as the “LNG chain.” It is made up of distinct parts: upstream, liquefaction plant, shipping, regasification and gas distribution. In this issue, we’ll discuss the gathering and processing aspects of the chain (upstream), as well as the liquefaction plants. Of course, the entire process begins with a decision to develop a gas field. That decision is typically related to the distance from the gas field to market, if a pipeline is available or if LNG shipment is required. Other considerations include the amount of recoverable gas, the cost to produce the gas that is delivered to the liquefaction plant in the removal of any impurities from the gas, a port that is close enough to the gas field for a liquefaction plant to be built, a political situation that supports longterm investments and a market price that is high enough to support the entire process and provide a good return. The upstream section of the LNG chain is very similar to regular gas systems. It includes drilling exploratory wells and eventually drilling and operating wells that recover the natural gas and bring it to the surface. The exact placement of an exploration well depends on the nature of the formation to be drilled, what the geology of the formation looks like, and the depth and size of the deposit. After a geophysical team chooses the best location for a well, the drilling company works to ensure that it completes all the necessary steps so that it can egally drill in that area. Securing permits for the drilling operations is a critical part of this phase. Once a natural gas well is drilled, and it has been confirmed that a large enough quantity of natural gas is there to commercially develop, the well must be “completed” to allow the natural gas to flow out of the formation and up to the surface. This process includes evaluating the pressure and temperature of the formation, running casing and tubing, and using the proper equipment to ensure an efficient flow of natural gas out of the well. A piece of equipment, referred to as a “Christmas tree” fits on top of the well, and contains tubes and valves that control the flow of gas and other fluids out of the well. It contains many branches and is shaped somewhat like a tree. The “Christmas tree” is the most noticeable part of a well, and allows people on the surface to monitor and regulate the production from a producing well. A typical “Christmas tree” is about six feet...

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Alliance in the News: We See Mining Opportunities
Oct26

Alliance in the News: We See Mining Opportunities

The Alliance was in the news this week with op-eds by General Manager Rebecca Logan highlighting the need for permitting reform and focusing on the bright future that could be ahead for mining if we make the right decisions now. Alaskan economy needs Mining permitting reform (MineralsMakeLife.org) My Turn: Pebble problems reveal larger issue facing mineral projects (Juneau Empire) Compass: We must see rich opportunities in mining (Anchorage Daily...

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LNG 101 week two: Global demand on the rise
Oct22

LNG 101 week two: Global demand on the rise

Why is there a global demand for LNG? The answer is simple. The world needs more energy and wants clean energy, safe energy and affordable energy. The global population is predicted to rise from 7 billion to 9 billion in 2050 and the world will obviously need more energy. LNG is a safe, clean, and efficient energy source and is already part of the global energy mix. According to the International Group of Liquefied Natural Gas Import- ers, since 2006, China, Brazil, Chile, Dubai, Kuwait, the Netherlands, Canada and Mexico all became first-time importers of LNG. These countries joined LNG consumers from Japan, South Korea and Taiwan. In 2012, 25 different countries imported LNG. While natural gas demand has grown by about 2.7 percent per year since 2000, LNG demand has risen by about 7.6 percent per year in the same time period — almost three times faster. Since 2001, the total volume of LNG shipped has doubled to reach 496 million cubic meters, the equivalent of about 1.5 billion barrels of oil. Between 2009 and 2010 alone, world LNG trade grew by 22.6 percent. That trend is expected to continue, even though there was a downward trend in LNG trade in 2012. The International Energy Agency (IEA) forecasts a growing need for natural gas in the world’s energy mix, with the natural gas share growing from 21 percent in 2010 to 25 percent in 2035. It is important to note that natural gas was the only fossil fuel whose share was growing. The IEA sees global natural gas demand growing at about 1.6 percent per year through 2035, more than twice the expected growth rate for oil. Other forecasters put the growth rate for gas even higher. LNG demand growth is, however, expected to be even stronger, particularly through 2020. While a wide range of forecasts exist, a majority of industry analysts see average annual growth of around 5 percent to 6 percent per year. After 2020, demand growth is expected to continue, at a slightly slower pace — around 2 percent to 3 percent per year. Many industry experts agree the increase in LNG demand has been driven by a strong need from Asia, currently 60 percent of the total demand, and by political pressure to guarantee energy supply security, improve energy infrastructure, and reduce the world’s carbon footprint, by replacing coal with natural gas, while economies and population grow. In addition, the nuclear plant explosion in Fukishima in 2011 has led to rising popular opposition to nuclear power generation and more emphasis on LNG. The impact of the Fukushima disaster on global LNG need was high-lighted as...

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Don’t miss out! Directory deadline October 28th
Oct16

Don’t miss out! Directory deadline October 28th

Your presence in the Alliance directory is an important way for other members and companies to know about your services and products. Make sure you make the deadline to be included for this coming year. ·         150 companies have not renewed at this time and therefore are not eligible to be in the 2014 Directory ·         100 companies have renewed but have not updated their directory information ·         Deadline is October 28th! ·         For Directory Updates email Renee at rlimoge@alaskaalliance.com ·         For Renewals email Ann...

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